Knee Arthroscopy

Knee arthroscopy is surgery that is done to check for problems, using a tiny camera to see inside your knee. Other medical instruments may also be inserted to repair your knee.
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ACL Reconstruction

ACL reconstruction is knee surgery to replace the ligament in the center of your knee with a new ligament. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) keeps your shin bone (tibia) in place. A tear of this ligament can cause your knee to give way during physical activity.
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Knee Meniscus Tears

The meniscus is a C-shaped piece of cartilage. Cartilage is found in certain joints and forms a buffer between the bones to protect the joint. The meniscus serves as a shock-absorption system, assists in lubricating the joint, and limits the ability to flex and extend the joint. Meniscal tears are most commonly caused by twisting or over-flexing the joint.
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Knee Arthritis

Generally, the pain associated with arthritis develops gradually, although sudden onset is also possible. The joint may become stiff and swollen, making it difficult to bend or straighten the knee.

Pain and swelling are worse in the morning or after a period of inactivity. Pain may also increase after activities such as walking, stair climbing, or kneeling.

The pain may often cause a feeling of weakness in the knee, resulting in a “locking” or “buckling.” Many people report that changes in the weather also affect the degree of pain from arthritis.
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Knee Arthroscopy Exercises

Regular exercise to restore your knee mobility and strength after knee surgery is necessary. For the most part, this can be carried out at home. Dr. Samimi may recommend that you exercise approximately 20 to 30 minutes two or three times a day. You also may be advised to engage in a walking program.
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Total Knee Replacement

Knee joint replacement is surgery to replace a knee joint with an artificial joint. The artificial joint is called a prosthesis.
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Partial Knee Replacement (Unicompartmental Knee Replacement)

Partial Knee Replacement may be appropriate if you are age 60 years or older, not obese, and relatively sedentary. Among other specific qualifications, your knee must have:

  • An intact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).
  • No significant inflammation.
  • No damage to the other compartments, calcification of cartilage, or dislocation.

Your doctor will verify that your knee meets the requirements when he or she begins the surgery.
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Knee Replacement Exercises

Regular exercise to restore your knee mobility and strength and a gradual return to everyday activities are important for your full recovery. Your orthopedic surgeon and physical therapist may recommend that you exercise approximately 20 to 30 minutes two or three times a day and walk 30 minutes, two or three times a day during your early recovery.
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